Are We Thinking Straight?: The Politics of Straightness in a by Daniel K Cortese

By Daniel K Cortese

This publication highlights the strategic deployment of a instantly identification through an LGBT association. Cortese explores the ways that activists strategically use a "straight" id as a social move software as a way to effectively in achieving the circulation targets.

Show description

Read or Download Are We Thinking Straight?: The Politics of Straightness in a Lesbian and Gay Social Movement Organization (New Approaches in Sociology: Studies in Social ... Social Changes, and Social Justice) PDF

Best education books

Bound for Freedom: Black Los Angeles in Jim Crow America (George Gund Foundation Imprint in African American Studies)

Paul Bontemps determined to maneuver his relations to la from Louisiana in 1906 at the day he eventually submitted to a strictly enforced Southern custom--he stepped off the sidewalk to permit white males who had simply insulted him to go by means of. neighbors of the Bontemps relatives, like many others beckoning their household West, had written that la used to be "a urban known as heaven" for individuals of colour.

Race and Ethnicity in Multiethnic Schools: A Critical Case Study

This article explores the illustration of race/ethnicity in a multiethnic institution. utilising a severe case examine process, it appeals to the broader social context to provide an explanation for the unequal fight over the which means of race and ethnicity within the tuition. In doing so it examines how stereotyping, curriculum, identification and language practices supply benefits for a few and penalize others.

Additional resources for Are We Thinking Straight?: The Politics of Straightness in a Lesbian and Gay Social Movement Organization (New Approaches in Sociology: Studies in Social ... Social Changes, and Social Justice)

Sample text

Frame analysis is built upon the “tool-kit” model of organizational strategies and its use of cultural symbols (Clemens 1993; Swidler 1986). From my observations of SAGA, I noted that the activists strategically deploy the cultural meanings of what “straightness” is, as well as a straight identity in a “tool-kit” fashion. This framing of what straightness means in society and, therefore, what the cultural message must mean to witness straight people joining the mission is also contingent upon the sociopolitical environment in which each chapter exists.

However, as I addressed earlier, the identity deployment strategies of “straightness” vary by geography. Specifically, I consider the ways in which activists in SAGA rely more on a straight identity for political validation in more conservative political areas of the United States. And, although activists in more liberal areas continue to deploy a straight identity as well, they rely less on this as a form of political legitimacy and more on gaining broader access into “straight” social networks.

Although they may openly express their Judeo-Christian faith as a member of the organization, they do not strategically use moral symbolism as a means to a particular social movement goal. Rather, in SAGA, some activists ever-so-delicately infuse a Christian moral frame with an injustice frame in order to achieve the organizational mission. Other research demonstrates that this is not unusual for movements in general (For example, see McAdam 1988; Young 2001, 2002), but in many of the recent theories on the culture war movements, it is understood that identity-based “liberal” organizations, such as the feminist or queer movements, typically rely upon the injustice frame, and their political opposition (religious right movements), primarily utilize a moral frame (For example, see Rohlinger 2002; see also Stein 2001).

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.46 of 5 – based on 17 votes